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Thread: Puberty Anyone?

  1. #11
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    Oh man, I am NOT ready for this!!! DD just turned 6 so hopefully we have a few years before I really need to think about it. I was on the later side so I'm hoping she follows me (bra at 12 and started my period a few days before my 13th bday). I remember being very freaked out by it all and just not wanting to grow up and deal with any of it. I was terribly embarrassed by it all. I hope DD is not as freakish about it all like I was.

    DS1 is 8 and I have no idea what puberty with boys is like....... I hope easier than with girls but you never know. He is starting to lean out big time and is getting quite tall. I have also noticed a lot more hair on his legs. It's still blond but there is a lot more of it..... man, they get so big so quick!!!! Makes me sad
    S+B Est. 11.09.02
    DS1 06.28.06, DD 07.23.08
    DS2 03.07.12

  2. #12
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    Laura--Thanks for that. It helps to know I'm not alone! I feel so badly for my DD because what should be a natural thing makes her unhappy.

    Southerlooper--the American Girl book is really good. And the kids can read it themselves if they don't want mom doing it with them. We did some of both.

    I am pretty open with DD, but she really doesn't like hearing about this stuff. She says she wants to play with her kitten and stuffed animals and not think about this stuff. It makes me sad that it is happening when she's still such a kid and not a teenager. But I hope it's just long and drawn out. The doctor says sometimes when puberty starts earlier (like 8) it takes longer to complete.

    I have my own issues with my DD having early puberty, which I think I've hidden very well from her (I hope so). I'm upset she's going through this before she's ready. I'm sad she is not happy with her body. And I'm worried she'll get attention from boys before she's ready (she doesn't even have crushes on boy bands right now. Nothing. Her wall is full of kitten posters). She's just such a kid, still. And I want her to stay that way for a while more.

    But we talk, I reassure, and I keep gently trying to give her more information.
    Wife: August, 2002 ~ LJ ~ Mother: May, 2005

  3. #13
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    Southlooper - Make sure you buy the revised version of the Care and Keeping of You. The original one covered EVERYTHING. Now they have a Book 1, Book 2 type set up with the first book covering the changing body and is more age appropriate for our girls. There is also a Feelings book that DD loves to read. It was really eye opening for her in that she is already suffering from massive P-PMS mood swings/depression. She is even starting to track her mood to see if there is a cycle to it.

    As for us, DD just turned 9 and is not there yet. One of her girl scout friends has already gotten her period a 9.25 years old about about 4/12 of the girls have very noticeable breast buds. We gave her the book to prepare her not just for her own changing body but also the bodies of those around her and the talk that may go with it. I did not want her to feel confused.

    I am sure that DD will not talk to me about changes but would much rather read a book. I will broach the topic more as it becomes more timely for her. And if I had a first moon party for her, she would literally curl up in a ball a sob.

  4. #14
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    And if I had a first moon party for her, she would literally curl up in a ball a sob.
    LOL. I think my DD would never speak to me again!

    Here are some other thoughts: around here many of the hospitals offer classes for kids and their parents (generally separate ones for girls and boys). The recommendation is to take the class when your child is between 10 and 12, but you can do it earlier if you think it's a good idea. (Naturally, my DD adamantly refuses to go. I am really hoping she changes her mind on that!)

    There are first period kits (I haven't gotten one yet for DD but I probably should just in case it's sooner rather than later). This one was recommended to me: http://www.dotgirlproducts.com/
    Wife: August, 2002 ~ LJ ~ Mother: May, 2005

  5. #15
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    I am VERY excited. This is the FIRST time I've been able to log in for almost 3 weeks!!

    My ODD is 7, will be 8 in a few months, and so far no sign at all of anything. I wanted to ask, though, if any of you who have girls starting young have asked their pediatricians about precocious puberty. I do wonder because a friend of mine has a daughter who started showing signs of puberty at 8 (breast buds) and her Dr. was very concerned. They did some tests, including an MRI and it showed that she does indeed have a cyst in her brain that is over producing sex hormones. The child has been on lupron to prevent puberty (she is now 9.5) and will stay on it until at least 10.5. From my conversations with her, I was led to believe that really any sign of puberty at 8 or 9 was really not "normal" and has some significant negative impacts (not only social emotional) and hence the recommended course of lupron. Just curious what other Dr's attitudes to this are.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by kemorr View Post
    I am VERY excited. This is the FIRST time I've been able to log in for almost 3 weeks!!

    My ODD is 7, will be 8 in a few months, and so far no sign at all of anything. I wanted to ask, though, if any of you who have girls starting young have asked their pediatricians about precocious puberty. I do wonder because a friend of mine has a daughter who started showing signs of puberty at 8 (breast buds) and her Dr. was very concerned. They did some tests, including an MRI and it showed that she does indeed have a cyst in her brain that is over producing sex hormones. The child has been on lupron to prevent puberty (she is now 9.5) and will stay on it until at least 10.5. From my conversations with her, I was led to believe that really any sign of puberty at 8 or 9 was really not "normal" and has some significant negative impacts (not only social emotional) and hence the recommended course of lupron. Just curious what other Dr's attitudes to this are.
    I think that depends also on height, weight, and family history. When I was teaching 1st grade I had a set of twins who were already wearing bras, but they were HUGE (about 100 lbs, and about the same size as me.) While both parents were also big people (in stature and weight) I believe it was a combination of genetics and bad diet. I read sometime ago that there was a correlation of poor diet and the additives that are put in meats to early puberty.

    As for my DD, because she was so small we consulted with a pediatric endocrinologist over the summer to rule out hormone deficiency. All her tests came back normal. Like I said before, I was around the same age when I started developing so I am not too concerned. Incidentally, although I was young, I was always on the smaller end of the cup size spectrum throughout middle school, which prompted some unwelcomed comments from my fellow students. Today? Thanks to two pregnancies, I am topping out in a G cup. Feast or famine...
    Last edited by Southlooper; 09-06-2014 at 05:35 PM.

  7. #17
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    I do wonder, though, if there is value in preventing early puberty even if tests reveal that there is no medical reason for it (like there is with my friend's daughter - the cyst). Particularly in cases like Dally's where her little girl is clearly struggling emotionally with it and so is her mother. If she is the only child in her peer group currently experiencing it and she is also not emotionally ready for it, I could see how there would be benefit to delaying it a little. I know someone has to be "first" but if my DD was clearly not emotionally ready and none of her peers appeared to be heading down that path anytime soon I would probably ask my Dr. My friend's daughter clearly has a medical cause for it but she is also a large girl (wears size 9.5 ladies shoes, size 12 ladies clothes although she is only about 5 foot 4) and is in a lower socioeconomic group so while I know not much about her diet I could see how it would potentially not be the best.

    This topic IS timely, though, because my ODD came home from school upset the other day because one of the other girls in her class was "bragging" that she was going to buy sports bras that afternoon. This girl is clearly pleased she is requiring sports bras, not upset. This girl is very large, though, so I think the sports bras are more for chubbiness than true breast buds. Has anyone dealt with that in younger kids? My DD wanted to know when she was getting sports bras, but as her chest is all bone, I don't think that's going to happen soon!

  8. #18
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    My DDs friend who got her period at 9.25 is in the care of endocrinologist due to hormone issues. Her mom, however, started at 9.5.

    My nephew is HUGE and 9.5 and has shown signs of puberty since he was 7. He is also checked out regularly. They think he is just big.

    Finally, I forgot about a little girl I knew who was in grade 3 and already had a solid a-cup and armpits full of hair. She was also close to 5' tall. Her parents were tall but not hue. Each parent easily weighs 275-300 lbs and have a terrible diet. Not sure what was going on there. She was definitely an anomaly.

    DD is likely getting a sports bra but only as a layer under her field hockey jersey.

  9. #19
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    For girls, "normal" puberty ranges from 8 - 16. 8 is on the early side, but not generally considered precocious puberty. Of course, it's worth testing if your child is in the early range. I'm pretty sure textbook precocious puberty are the cases where kids 4-6 get it. Which would be awful.

    My DD does see a pediatric endocrinologist for her early puberty. One of the tests they run are bone age scans (which are not precise but give an idea). DD's "bone age" is consistently 1.5 to 2 years older than her actual age. We have talked about doing the treatment to delay puberty (which DD wants), but there are a lot of side effects to that and you are messing with your body's hormonal balance. There are also side effects for early puberty (including unnaturally short stature and some cancers). The endocrinologist feels DD is on the line but it's best not to do treatment now because
    1) family history of early puberty (thanks MIL), and 2) her puberty is progressing slowly.

    I go back and forth on the treatment. I hate to put bad things in DD's body and honestly, we're the type of household that watches out for hormones in food and buys organic meat and milk, etc., so I don't think it's that for us. I really think it's family history--and maybe environmental factors. I don't know. I've asked myself that a lot.

    DD is not 100 pounds (more like low 80s). She used to be 50%tile in weight and taller than average, but since the puberty started, her weight has increased quickly. She's still taller than average (I'm not. I'm only 5'2"). She's probably 85%tile in weight and 75% in height. Neither DH nor I are overweight. And DD isn't either, but she's definitely bigger. DH and MIL both were chubby in the years just before and during puberty (but never after), so I wonder if she's just following family history with her weight gain. We work a lot on limiting treats and exercising, but it's hard. When I was a kid, I could and did eat anything I wanted without gaining anything. I probably was 15 before I weighed a 100 pounds. DD is following a different trajectory. It makes me sad for her because it was so much easier for me, and not because I was all healthy (I ate tons of junk when I was young)--just genetics.
    Last edited by Dally; 09-06-2014 at 07:04 PM.
    Wife: August, 2002 ~ LJ ~ Mother: May, 2005

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by kemorr View Post
    This topic IS timely, though, because my ODD came home from school upset the other day because one of the other girls in her class was "bragging" that she was going to buy sports bras that afternoon. This girl is clearly pleased she is requiring sports bras, not upset. This girl is very large, though, so I think the sports bras are more for chubbiness than true breast buds. Has anyone dealt with that in younger kids? My DD wanted to know when she was getting sports bras, but as her chest is all bone, I don't think that's going to happen soon!
    This reminds of this this article:

    Gather together a random assortment of 13-year-olds, and you’ll likely find yourself looking at a group of people who have only their age in common. Some will be way into teenage culture, into hanging out and hooking up, even into alcohol and drugs; others will be little changed from the children they were at 12, 11, even 10 years of age, still singing the songs and playing the games of children.
    http://parenting.blogs.nytimes.com/2...ype=blogs&_r=0

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