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  1. #11
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    Jun 2005
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    My first was an early talker with a crazy big vocabulary and long sentences. My second hardly said any (real) words. At 18 mo she had 6-7 so we referred her to Speech Tx. I just knew something was off but was trying not to compare her to her older sister since I knew that verbal wasn't normal either. Anyway, turned out DD2 had hearing loss due to frequent ear infections and needed tubes put in. Once she has the tubes in we saw lots of progress and she's caught up to her peers at age 2.5. Those few months of Speech Tx were great though and they were the ones that got us to the dr for hearing issues, our own drs didn't catch that!

    My advice, follow your instincts and don't be afraid to ask for help/testing.
    babygirl 10-29-07
    baby sister 7-17-11

  2. #12
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    Jun 2005
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    Both of my kids have serious speech delays and I started the process at 15 months for both of them to start receiving early intervention services. It wasn't so much because they didn't have any words (they didn't) but that they weren't really communicating in other ways (i.e. pointing, waving bye-bye) and they didn't seem to have much receptive language.
    I'm surrounded by boys!
    DH 6/29/02 ~ DS1 3/2/06 ~ DS2 10/15/09

  3. #13
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    Jul 2005
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    Thanks everybody. This is helpful information to keep looking. He doesn't wave or kiss yet either but he does manage to communicate and makes lots of sounds with different intentions. So I won't go crazy with worry yet. I guess I always thought being the second, he would talk sooner because he had DD to model after. But now I realize that because I spend a fair amount of time talking to her, I don't talk to him as much as I talked to her at that age.

    The other thing is that when she was turning one, everyone in her daycare class was either a good talker or a good walker and so I decided that you might be good at one or the other but usually not both. So what scared me is that at 14 months, he's not good at either. But he's pretty darn close so we'll see how it goes and I'll talk to the ped next month.

    But thanks because it gives me more ideas about how to interact with him and what to look for!
    Jenn...and Bill (5/25/03)
    ...and Natalie (10/10/07)
    ...and Oliver (11/12/12)

  4. #14
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    Jul 2005
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    YDD is a few weeks younger than your DS. While she's walking, it took her longer than her sisters. Like, YDD was over a year before she walked. ODD was 10 months and MDD was 9. We joked there must be something wrong with YDD. But, as a PP mentioned, if you can anticipate his needs/wants, he's less likely to NEED to communicate.

    Both my older girls are very helpful with YDD. One is always bringing her a toy or whatever. So for most of her life, everything has been brought to her without much of a wimper. Now we're trying to break her of this and she is not happy! But, she's communicating more because of it. Maybe it's sign language or a gesture that we've figured out means X. Or, she knows to go to the cabinet and get animal crackers - and that's her way to communicate her want for a snack. That sort of thing.

    All of our girls are late talkers. I worried with ODD, less so with MDD and now with YDD I figure she'll talk when she talks. She's definitely done things on her own schedule.
    Kidlet 1 - 8/06
    Kidlet 2 - 7/09
    Kidlet 3 - 12/12

  5. #15
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    Jul 2005
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    Iowa
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    Ds is 25 months old and only has two or three words and does not qualify for speech therapy. I do think he will at his next eval this March. He didn't babble until 14 months, and that was our first clue. He was evaluated by early access and not found to have a speech delay. Yet. He signs and gestures so well with nearly 40 signs and up until 2 I think it is, they count those as "words". But he does qualify for an "educator" that visits every other week. It's frustrating because I know speech therapy would help and by the time he actually qualifies, he'll nearly be aged out at 3.

    I don't think it's a concern yet but worth keeping on top of.

    Sent from my SCH-R530U using Tapatalk
    Last edited by Kanga; 02-18-2014 at 08:07 PM.
    DD8 DD7 DS2.5 DD 10.26.13

  6. #16
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    Sep 2005
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    I'm afraid that this is one of those things that you have to wait and see.

    DN(ephew) and my BFF growing up did not talk until age 4 when they started school. According to my SIL, once DN started school she "could not shut him up." BFF says the same thing about herself, in English, French, German, Swiss-German, and Russian.

    My DD had limited language development and was diagnosed with expressive language disorder at age four. This was after one or two evaluations with early intervention that could not come to a concrete conclusion.

    It's frustrating. Sending you support.

  7. #17
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    Jul 2005
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    I've been listening for "words" but I can't recognize a pattern in his babbles which doesn't mean they aren't there. And he's pretty good at communicating. This morning, I asked him if he wanted more breakfast. He opened his mouth and leaned in to the spoon. I took that as a yes.

    Chimi, for the record, he's not walking yet but our house has been so messy, he hasn't had many chances. Working on that and he is so close,


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Jenn...and Bill (5/25/03)
    ...and Natalie (10/10/07)
    ...and Oliver (11/12/12)

  8. #18
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    Jul 2005
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    My ODD was a late talker. She didn't really babble until maybe 12-13 months and never really had any words until 18 months. We took her to speech therapy at 15 months but stopped at 18 months because I saw absolutely no improvement and felt what they were doing with her was a waste of time. Anyway, right around 2 years, she started speaking in full paragraphs. She literally went from a few words to this enormous, fully fledged vocabulary overnight. Knowing her know as I do, it totally fits her perfectionist personality. She doesn't want to do anything publicly until she is sure she is perfect at it. Then it comes out very polished. It was the same with reading. One day she was reluctantly sounding out c.a.t with me, the next she was reading chapter books.

  9. #19
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    Jun 2005
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    Seattle
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    Quote Originally Posted by kemorr View Post
    She literally went from a few words to this enormous, fully fledged vocabulary overnight. Knowing her know as I do, it totally fits her perfectionist personality. She doesn't want to do anything publicly until she is sure she is perfect at it. Then it comes out very polished. It was the same with reading. One day she was reluctantly sounding out c.a.t with me, the next she was reading chapter books.
    Man this was my DS to a t. Just today he brought home an early level reader from K and was whining about reading it to me. When I pushed him to explain why he didn't want to read it, he explained he didn't know all the words already. He has such a perfectionist attitude he hates to do anything before he is great at it.

  10. #20
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    Jun 2005
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    My DS1 wasn't using more than a couple of words at his 18 month check up, and we were referred to a speech pathologist. She was great. To DS, it was a pretty lady to play games with. He's still in speech in Kindergarten. Part of the initial problem is that he was very good at communicating without words. The speech pathologist asked us to ignore the gestures and grunts and not oblige his "requests" until he used a word. Any word. So when he had made it clear he wanted a cookie, we would play dumb, and ask what he wanted. Even if he said, "Cah" we would say, "Cookie, good! Okay, here's your bookie! Good word!!!" And the words slowly filled in. It sounds like your DS could be pulling the same thing. So for you to try this, instead of giving him more, you could try asking him for a word. Then, give him more dinner when he makes any sound that could be called a word. Anything just over a grunt.

    As others have said, now we can't shut him up, and DS2 is ahead of where DS1 at his age. At the same time, DS1 had and still has amazing physical control of his body. He's very good at soccer and sports, he has incredible balance and is very fast. I think he just focused so much of his development on that, and forgot to leave a little energy for speaking.
    Married 7.3.04 Henry 10.29.08 Charlie 11.19.11

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