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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
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    Midwest
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    680

    Default Diet to lower cholesterol

    I did a search but didn't really find a thread that addresses diets to lower cholesterol; the threads all seem to be just about losing weight.

    I found out yesterday that my trigliceride level is 333 (<150 is normal). My good cholesterol is too low. I could really use some guidance on how to lower my trigliceride level. My doc faxed over a fact sheet on "good foods" and sheet on "foods to avoid", but I feel so overwhelmed. I would love some cholesterol-lowering recipes or whatever advice you have to offer.

    TIA!
    Madeline Elizabeth - 01.23.04
    Savannah Ruth - 11.26.05 (VBAC1)
    Caleb Joseph - 08.27.09 (VBAC2!)

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
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    6,604

    Default

    Just seeing this now...about 5 years ago, my tri level came back at 256. I realized that while I didn't eat a lot of red meats, I was gorging on full fat dairy products. I drastically cut back on the cheese and ice cream, and started exercising. I got it down to 160 in about 6 months, which is pretty much as low as it is going to go with my family history. Both my parents take Lipitor, just recently I found out my mom takes a higher dosage than my dad.
    Instead of having "answers" on a math test, they should just call them "impressions," and if you got a different "impression," so what, can't we all be brothers?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
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    clearly NOT at the cool kids table
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    9,766

    Default

    Trying to remember good fats and bad fats can be really overwhelming and confusing! I have a hereditary family history of high cholesteral/heart disease, even though my family tends to be slim. We simply do not metabolize cholesteral as well as many other people. But, by bearing the following in mind, I can keep my cholesteral lower:

    Cholesteral ONLY occurs in animal products. So olive oil, nuts, olives, avacados, etc., while they do have fat content, they have ZERO cholesteral. So they are good sources of fat whicjh will "satisfy" one without being high cholesteral. Just watch the calories!

    Fruits, vegetables and grains have ZERO cholesteral. Watch how they are prepared (salad dressing, ouils, and cheese sauces). Legumes and pulses (beans) are great sources of fiber and protien, and can be prepared in lower cholesteral methods. A little meat for flavoring is fine. A lot is not.

    I have to watch my dairy (never met a cheese sauce I did not like!). While I eat very little red eat, my cholesteral creeps up because cheese is very high in cholesteral.

    There are lots of theories on good and bad cholesterals and good fats you can eat to raise your good cholesteral. I find this confusing, at times. I just remember that fish is often agood source of lean, low cholesteral protien.

    Surprisingly, fried foods are not necesarily high cholesteral. They are higher in calories, however. Since most foods in the US are fried in some sort of vegetable oil (canola, peanut, safflower, etc) and not animal based oils (like many years ago) - even at fast food chains, a fried chicken breast sandwich will have no more cholesteral than the same size portion that is grilled or broiled. Again, it will have significantly more calories. The reason I point this out is: if wieght loss is not an issue and you are craving fast food or have not a lot of healthy choices (like when travelling ), fried chicken or fish choices are much, much better than burgers, with their all to common add-ons of bacon and cheese, because chicken breasts are much lower in cholesteral than beef patties. The frying (as long as no animal based oils are used) add calories but not cholesteral. And a fried chicken or fish choice is much better than pizza.

    If you are trying to quickly lower your numbers and ARE ON NO MEDICATION TO REDUCE CHOLESTERAL, eating oatmeal, high fiber foods and grapefruit in particular have been found to be helpful. Do not eat grapefruit iof you are on cholesteral medication without specifically clearing it with your doctor; it can have a harmful interaction with some cholesteral-lowering drugs.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Boston
    Posts
    1,499

    Default

    Would your insurance pay for you to see a dietitian? That would be the best thing, rather than relying on the Internet for advice (I'm not being snarky, I'm serious. Anyone can tell you they're qualified to give advice but it's hard to know if someone is actually trained.)

    With that said, the best thing you can do to raise your HDL and lower triglycerides (TG) is to exercise. That and follow a diet rich in whole grains, high in vegetables, low in meats and saturated fats, but moderate in overall fats. You don't want to follow a lowfat diet because that can result in your fats being replaced by carbohydrates which can in turn raise TG. Don't smoke, and don't drink much.

    Oh, and it's saturated fats in our diet that affect our cholesterol levels; we used to think dietary cholesterol was a problem but now research seems to indicate it's not the issue.
    marriage 10.2.04
    baby 10.23.07
    baby2 8.20.10

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Metrowest Boston
    Posts
    8,601

    Default

    What is the latest thought about eggs and cholesterol. I love hard boiled eggs/egg salad and am trying to find different ways to incorporate protein into my diet that is not cheese or red meat. My cholesterol is 185, which is is 20-30 points higher than it was a couple of years ago. I would like to get it back down and I am afraid of eating too many eggs (I do not like egg-white only). But I thought perhaps the advice about how many eggs to eat per week might have changed.
    J&D - May 2005 *** E - 8/7/06 *** J - 3/17/09

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Pennsylvania
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    Adding ground flax seed to meals (I like to mix it with oatmeal and yogurt) is a great way to reduce your triglyceride level. You can also cook and bake with it. Flax has a mild nutty flavor, and just adds a bit of texture. Fish oil pills are a good supplement to lower cholesterol, too.
    Be obscure clearly. E.B. White

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
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    Default

    Flax seeds are also a laxative, and the amounts that "affect" people vary, so if you do use it, plan on being at home the first time.

    I don't love eggs, but I do eat them for breakfast at least 3 times per week. I try to use the medium sized eggs rather than the jumbo or large ones.
    Instead of having "answers" on a math test, they should just call them "impressions," and if you got a different "impression," so what, can't we all be brothers?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    3

    Default

    Fish oil pills are a good supplement to reduce cholesterol levels, too.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    5

    Default

    We people eat so much oily food that is the main reason of cholesterol. We should eat low calories food but natural food like vegetables and fruits. These food are good for health and with eating vegetables we can maintain our cholesterol level.

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