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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
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    Default The Koehler Method: Dog training questions and answers

    My credentials:

    Three Obedience Title holders trained by me Charjean Nokola Charade, CD (Will Judy Award), CDX, : Charjean Nokola Moonstruck, CD (Will Judy Award), CDX. Cooley's Serendipity, CD (Will Judy Award), TDX)

    Co Owner (trainer) of Ch Nokola Ziggy Stardust (Will Judy Award for all three Obedience titles), UD, TDX OTCH)
    Co Owner (trainer) of Ramblewood Sprite of Nokola UD(Will Judy award for all three obedience titles).

    All those letters look impressive, but the only reason I even share them is to show some measure of my own, dog training credibility.

    I hope to have a training thread on CC where those that are struggling with dog training issues can ask for help. Hopefully, I have enough experience to offer the proper help, or at least, guide you in the best direction. I train using a modified Koehler method, so I will give suggestions to training problems based on this methoc, as it's what I know and have used successfully for over 20 years.

    I don't know everything, and I am best with dogs of the sporting group, but any questions you might have regarding training, with any breed (they are, after all, canines) I will do my best to help you with.

    Hugs,
    gayle

    Ammendment to all those letters.

    CD=AKC Companion Dog Title, dog must heel properly on and off lead, pattern must include figure 8's, dogs nose to never extend past handlers knee. Must hold a sit stay for 3 minutes, must hold a down stay for 5 minutes. Must do an immediate recall (dog come) when called, and return automatically to heel position at handlers left side.
    CDX= Companion Dog Excellent Title, adds Jumps and and all heeling is off lead. Also adds retrieves
    UD= Dog works on hand signals and scent discrimination. Dog must be proficient in all of the above, and must have earned both a CD and a CDX. Sophisticated jumps, hand signal work, retrieves and scent discrimination.
    TD= Tracking dog, is scent trained to find humans and/ or other things, responds to handler via sound, hand signal and other.
    TDX= Tracking Dog excellent (all airport security dogs are the equivalent of TDX's)
    CH_ Breed Champion, beauty title
    OTCH_ Breed Champion, who is also top of the line UD Obedience Dog (very few ever make this combo title)

    What's will Judy?
    http://wrgrc.org/about/awards/awards.php

    The layman's version is a "Will Judy" dog earns scores of 190 and above, in three straigt trials, for all three legs of any Obedience title. Dog also earns those "legs" in three consecutive trials. Obedience title being: CD, CDX, UD, TD or TDX
    Last edited by gayle; 04-28-2007 at 02:00 PM.
    "If you don't pray in my schools, I won't think in your church."

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
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    3,914

    Default

    Ooh, I have a question!

    I have a toy poodle who is 8.5 months old. When we go on walks, and she sees other dogs, she goes nuts! She pulls on her leash so hard that she is either scaling the ground or on her hind legs. But worse is her crying/screaming! It is so embarassing! What can I do to get her to stop behaving this way?

    Thanks!
    Katie & Paul, wedded bliss since June 11, 2005
    TWINS! Abby and Brady born August 29, 2009
    SURPRISE! Claire Zoe born October 26, 2010

  3. #3
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    Jun 2005
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    Default

    NotDesperate, what kind of collar are you using?

    I would put her on a proper choke, or slip collar. When she goes bonkers, I would give her a good swift correction, then rapidly turn and walk the other way for a few steps. Once she has settled, turn back towards the other dog, and begin to walk with her as though nothing has occured. If the other dog is still there, and your puppy behaves the same way, correct her again, and follow through the same way.

    Once she is able to turn and walk towards the other dog without reaction, stop and praise her profusely. I mean, get down on the ground with her, love her up, pet her, and tell her how amazing she is!

    Effective dog training is all about balancing swift and strong correction, with effusive and over-the-top praise for a job done right!
    "If you don't pray in my schools, I won't think in your church."

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
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    The Middle of Nowhere
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    Gayle ~ Baloo (our 3 1/2 year old American Bulldog) has the habit of putting his paws (or even trying to jump) up onto the counters to see what food is left up there. We correct him when we catch him in the act, but how do we get him to stop jumping up to see what is on the counters?

    Thanks!
    Married Life Begins 4.26.03
    Life with our Son Begins 6.22.08

  5. #5
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    Jun 2005
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    Default

    Belm, American Bulldogs are so cute!!!

    When you are in the kitchen, I would make sure that he is on a choke collar, with a very short lead attached, I would suggest one foot. When he jumps on the counter, I would instantly correct him using the short lead, correcting him off the counter and to the floor.


    Use a command at the same time, I would use "Baloo, OFF". If you correct strongly, it shouldn't take more than a couple of instances for him to get the message that this is no longer allowed, and using the command at the same time, will adapt him to eventually responding just to the command.
    "If you don't pray in my schools, I won't think in your church."

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
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    3,914

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    Quote Originally Posted by Belm View Post
    Gayle ~ Baloo (our 3 1/2 year old American Bulldog) has the habit of putting his paws (or even trying to jump) up onto the counters to see what food is left up there. We correct him when we catch him in the act, but how do we get him to stop jumping up to see what is on the counters?

    Thanks!
    Belm, it's called Counter Surfing!!!

    And thank you Gayle for your help! I will try that.
    Katie & Paul, wedded bliss since June 11, 2005
    TWINS! Abby and Brady born August 29, 2009
    SURPRISE! Claire Zoe born October 26, 2010

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    White Rock, BC
    Posts
    490

    Default

    Hi Gayle

    Thanks for starting this thread, i have a 8 month old puppy and i am trying to get him to be more calm when people come to the door.

    I have started putting him on a leash when someone is at the front door and try to get him to sit, but he doesn't stay sitting for long when he sees who it is.

    Any suggestions.

    Thanks

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    TN
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    Default

    If you offer, we will come!

    We have a 1.5 year old male miniature dachshund. He is not neutered (trying to find a chocolate carrying female to breed him with is *hard*), so I know this adds to his problem at times. Anyway...

    Background- We live in an apartment complex with two large dogs living above us and, obviously, people walking/talking outside. Sabin, our dog, will run to the door and bark whenever he hears this or is not being played with. He's better at my IL's house, unless he hears a car or something. Dogs bark, that's fine, but I would like him to listen to me when I say "no bark" to let him know I hear what's going on and he can stop.

    How can we get him to listen to us when we command "no bark?" The trainer we had before let us borrow a shock collar, but I couldn't bear to use it again after the one time he had it on. He will leave the door if you shake coins in a jar or something like that, but only momentarily. Then he goes right back to barking...

    Thanks!

    -Cassie
    The wait is over: DS 9/16/08
    Waiting for #DS2: 08/05/10

  9. #9
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    Jun 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by lovebugs2003 View Post
    Hi Gayle

    Thanks for starting this thread, i have a 8 month old puppy and i am trying to get him to be more calm when people come to the door.

    I have started putting him on a leash when someone is at the front door and try to get him to sit, but he doesn't stay sitting for long when he sees who it is.

    Any suggestions.

    Thanks

    You have the right idea lovebugs! Keep him on a leash and choke collar, and correct him if he acts too exciteable when people come to the door. Also, use a command, because eventually you want to be able to not have to have him collared and leashed, but to respond to the command instead.


    Be patient with him however, 8 months is very young and they are mentally still very much puppies at that time. In formal obedience trials, the youngest you can even enter a dog is 6 months. I don't actually do any formal training with a dog until they are that age, and don't expect top polished performance form any dog under the age of a year.
    "If you don't pray in my schools, I won't think in your church."

  10. #10
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    East Bay
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    Gayle, thank you so much for starting this thread!

    My 2 1/2 yr old Ridgie Lab mix is having a hard time with the doggie door. It's kind of our fault. We installed a door that was for a small-medium dog and we just didn't notice that it had become too small for him. We replaced the doggie door with a larger, but he is still carrying on about it, and seems to have retained some negative expectations about the door. He uses it, but not with ease. How can we help him gain confidence in using his doggie door?

    In general, I would like to help him be more confident in new situations. He is very obedient and submissive, walks well, has basic obedience, good manners and good recall. He is very gentle and well-socialized, makes friends easily with people and most dogs. He goes to the office with Pita a few times a week. But I would say that he is slow to warm to new dogs - not naturally outgoing. He has dog-friends and can hang out in a pack of dogs pretty well.

    I don't even really know how to begin. Is it possible to help him be more confident or should I just accept him as he is? I know I don't have much to complain about. He's a good little guy.
    Nothing can withstand the power of millions of voices calling for change. Obama 08. Yes We Can.
    pocketjournal

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