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  1. #1
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    Default Naughty neighbor - window shaped like middle finger

    Somebody builds a house that blocks the view of their neighbor. The neighbor complains to the city. The builder gets even by installing a window shaped like a hand flipping the bird. Check out the article and picture at:

    Middle-finger to neighbor

  2. #2
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    What an ass! I'd want to burn that guy's house down. Our neighbors built a two-story garage with dormers right up against our property and ruined our view after we'd only lived here a few months, so this just gets me steamed up all over again.
    Writing: a socially acceptable form of schizophrenia.

  3. #3
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    If the house being built is to code, plans approved by the city/county/whomever, the people with their view ruined need to deal and stop harrassing the neighbor. If the view was that important, he should have bought that land himself so that there was no chance of it being ruined. It is not his property, it is therefore not his decision.

    Seeing the vent, I didn't really interpret it as giving the middle finger. Maybe the neighbor needs to get his mind out of the gutter, or stop looking so deeply into it to have another grievance with his neighbor. If I saw that without being told what the neighbor thinks it is, I would have never guessed it is that gesture.


    ETA: Looking at the photo in the article, I can still see a whole lot of mountains. This man just strikes me as extremely whiney.
    If you voted Bush a yellow ribbon won't make up for it.
    It's not about being a Democrat and losing an election. It's about being an American and losing our rights.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by SingleWhiteFemale View Post
    If the view was that important, he should have bought that land himself so that there was no chance of it being ruined.
    So, do you feel that only those who are wealthy enough to afford multiple properties deserve to enjoy the view of wherever their home happens to be?
    Writing: a socially acceptable form of schizophrenia.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by greenbunny View Post
    So, do you feel that only those who are wealthy enough to afford multiple properties deserve to enjoy the view of wherever their home happens to be?
    So, do you feel that people shouldn't be able to build--a structure that is completely within local requirements/codes--on their own property?

    There is a housing development that overlooks a golf course where I live. It is a lovely, well manicured golf course. But for more privacy, the course put up huge trees, hence these homes no longer overlook this lovely peice of property. Should they get all in a tizzy over it and force the course to take down their perfectly legal trees so they can have their view back?

    There's a small horse arena next that my neighborhood is built around (the arens was there before the development). The people whose back yard faces the arena put up high shrubs at the back of their property to obstruct the view/gain privacy. The neighbors, who had an unobstructed view of the rink no longer do because of these huge new plants. Should they be forced to cut down these perfectly legal shrubs so the neighbors don't have to leave their home to watch the shows? Whose rights trumps whose? Those who own the property on which the structure is built.

    Where one's property line ends is where their say ends. Period. This man does not have a real right to complain.

    I think it is most telling in the second picture--there is still a HUGE view of the mountains that is not obstructed. So, the man does have a "view" to enjoy.

    If you want to preserve the view, buy the property so that it cannot be developed. Have it rezoned. Act like the biggest asshole of a neighbor to scare away potential buyers. I honestly don't care however it is done. But to say there is a "right" to that view, when there technically is NOT, is unfair. One doesn't have to be wealthy.
    If you voted Bush a yellow ribbon won't make up for it.
    It's not about being a Democrat and losing an election. It's about being an American and losing our rights.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by SingleWhiteFemale View Post
    Seeing the vent, I didn't really interpret it as giving the middle finger. Maybe the neighbor needs to get his mind out of the gutter, or stop looking so deeply into it to have another grievance with his neighbor. If I saw that without being told what the neighbor thinks it is, I would have never guessed it is that gesture.

    ETA: Looking at the photo in the article, I can still see a whole lot of mountains. This man just strikes me as extremely whiney.
    I have no clue who's right or wrong in terms of the codes, but I can't see anything BUT a gesture of giving the finger in that vent. And that's inappropriate regardless of the rest of the issues.

  7. #7
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    Generally speaking, there's no legal right to a view unless someone has entered into some sort of agreement with their neighbors on a restriction from blocking their view. Some cities or housing developments may have particular ordinances or CC&Rs about it, though. Also, there are sometimes laws for exceptions for things like "spite fences," where neighbors build exceptionally tall fences just to annoy their neighbors.

    FWIW, the same thing goes with light. You don't generally have a legal leg to stand on if your neighbor plants tall trees and your backyard suddenly no longer gets sun.

    That said, it would naturally upset me to lose my view. My neighbor recently put up lattice around the top of his deck, which basically blocks most of my view of dowtown from my deck, and it did irk me at first. Luckily, we rent.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by SingleWhiteFemale View Post
    So, do you feel that people shouldn't be able to build--a structure that is completely within local requirements/codes--on their own property?
    I don't think it's necessarily that simple. I think a lot of codes are inappropriate, and are set up in ways that are unfair. And I think that just because something is legal doesn't mean it's a neighborly thing to do.

    For example, my neighbor's garage is insane. It's as tall as his two-story house. It is more square footage than the house I grew up in. In my area, you basically can get a permit for anything as long as you can pay for it. They only reason he could afford the permit is because of his wife's inheritance. So it certainly isn't something anyone could have legally done, he had to have the cash lying around.

    As far as the golf course or horse arena example, I don't expect any sympathy from a business. I do expect individual neighbors to take into account the people they have to live next to when choosing how to develop their property.

    You seem to have a very black and white view of things. Do you really believe that as long as you're protected by the law, you're always automatically right? Maybe in a courtroom, but that's not the only rule by which to measure. Being considerate goes a long way considering you could end up living next to people for years on end.

    As far as the exact angle and the guy's view of the mountains, I don't think you can really tell from only that one picture. I can see over my neighbor's garage if I stand on the hill in the very back corner of my yard. If you'd take a picture from that angle, you'd ask what I could possibly be complaining about. It's only when you come down to the rest of the yard, or in my house and look through my windows, that you realize all I can see is shingles.
    Writing: a socially acceptable form of schizophrenia.

  9. #9
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    I agree with greenbunny that you really should be considerate of your neighbors. The way it worked when I lived in a TH is that you could do stuff in your backyard as long as your neighbor OKs it. My neighbor built a taller fence (by 6") since he added a deck that raised the level to where he could peer into his neighbors' yards. It was fine, I guess, but wasn't aesthetically pleasing since it was an extra fence butting up against mine.

    The home we just sold had ~2 acres of land with absolutely no restrictions since we were outside city limits. The couple that bought it is apparently building this huge garage thingy at the end of the driveway--not even in the back of the property like I would expect. I'm sure the neighbors aren't pleased, but there's no view to be lost, at least. Now, they best be glad the previous crazy-lady neighbor who was a member of the "drainage commitee" isn't living there anymore. I wasn't sad to see her go, and it made me chuckle hard that it took them 8 months to sell since they built a freakin' retention pond on 1/3 of their land that's even smaller than ours, but we sold in 2 weeks for almost the same and their house was bigger.

    On another note, an ex-bf's gm was in a lawsuit with her neighbor for obstructing his view. I don't remember the details but the best part was, the wife brought the suit on behalf of her husband, who was, by the way, *blind*. She didn't mind, but it bothered him immensely.
    "Dance like it hurts. Love like you need the money. Work when people are watching." -Dogbert

  10. #10
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    There are instances where a view is protected. We have friends whose title company sued a nasty neighbor because he worked to obstruct their ocean views during the sale of the house. Nasty Neighbor had to remove his enormous sign.

    As for the middle finger guy - there's a huge difference between having the law on your side and being a decent guy. He may be legally right, but he sure seems like an ass.

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