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View Full Version : Letting someone use my address to enroll their kid in school.



mar5195
09-05-2007, 05:11 PM
I was just wondering what would be the ramifications of letting someone use my address to enroll their son in my local HS?

Personally I don't see any. I have no children right now and I'm technically paying for it so I don't see why letting someone use my address so their son can to to the local HS is a problem.

He's a good kid. He was in private school but they raised the rates. The HS in his neighborhood is really terrible it's either that or he gets home schooled which would be fine but he's a Junior and his mother wants him to continue on with the HS experience, not to mention his mom works so he'd be left to his own devices during the day.

She didn't ask I was thinking of offering.

jki
09-05-2007, 05:13 PM
I don't think it's that easy..... at least in our town, in order to enroll in public school, you need a copy of your driver's license, property tax bill or lease, and 3 utility bills for 3 months showing your name and address.

LDS Angel 19
09-05-2007, 05:17 PM
Hmmm. My mom did that for my sister and I. Our house was being bulit, to be finished in November, and she enrolled us using my aunts address with no problem. This was 10 years ago though so it might be harder now.

Chelsea524
09-05-2007, 05:19 PM
My sister uses my address for her daughter, I know its not honest but its the only way to make things work for us as we trade off on babysitting before and after school. If they did find out the worst that would happen is she has to go to the school she is supposed to go to, I've heard of others in this same school have that happen so I'm not too worried. We didn't have to have any proof of address for signing up though, so if you do that could be hard.

honeygirl
09-05-2007, 05:21 PM
Is it bad that I thought of 90210 and Andrea when I saw the title of this thread?

She may want to try to get an exception rather then get around the rule. I'm not sure if it's illegal to use your address, but you might want to check.

pocket
09-05-2007, 05:23 PM
I would just do it.

Chelsea524
09-05-2007, 05:29 PM
Another thing, if she does use your address to get him into the school, once he is in she would have a better chance at getting an exception to allow him to stay if she says she has moved since then.

LIZNKEITH
09-05-2007, 05:31 PM
I think it depends on your district. I know the county next to us cracked down on this issue. They were actually locking people up in jail.

Fenway
09-05-2007, 05:32 PM
Some schools around here do random checks to see if the student truly lives in that town.

PinkMartini
09-05-2007, 05:36 PM
They were actually locking people up in jail.

:eek: Wow.. What a waste of $$$$

jennylou
09-05-2007, 05:55 PM
:eek: Wow.. What a waste of $$$$

Really? It amounts to fraud. Honestly, this irks me to no end. As a tax payer (and I have multiple properties in different districts) it gets old to be asked over and over again for more money for the schools. For our house, it's in a good school district. But, we pay for it by not living in a great area. We are on the border of sketchy town. We have a convenient store and pizza shop across the street from us, both of which have been robbed. The pizza shop actually had a murder in it (this was about 10 years ago). Yes, for the same price I could go into a different city and have a really *nice* house in a nice neighborhood. Only, the school district isn't so hot. So, it's a price that we pay. So, when I see people in that nice area of town sneaking their kids into my school district (and we pay through the nose in taxes, whereas they don't) it pisses me off. They'll be coming back soon enough for an increase. I don't mind supporting the kids in my community, in my school district, but I shouldn't have to pay for the kids that parents chose to live in a nice area but bad school district because they wanted a nice house (way nicer than mine).

A neighboring district has been throwing kids out over it and forcing the parents of the students to make up the cost between the state amount and what it costs to educate students. It sure cut down on that really quick.

mamax2
09-05-2007, 05:57 PM
I don't think it's that easy..... at least in our town, in order to enroll in public school, you need a copy of your driver's license, property tax bill or lease, and 3 utility bills for 3 months showing your name and address.

That's the same for us. HOWEVER, if you have a younger child who requires babysitting or something and your caregiver is in that district, you CAN enroll using that address. I also think in this case you could register, provide all the necessary documentation and the mother & son could simply say they're living with you for an indefinite period of time. Unless they do a home check, they'd never know. I agree that it may be a little dishonest, but as a mother of a school-aged child, I can see that I would be willing to bend the rules if push came to shove.

LeslieR
09-05-2007, 06:00 PM
You might want to check to see if there is an additional fee that they can pay for their child to go to school there. I know this was done at my HS.

mar5195
09-05-2007, 06:00 PM
Is it bad that I thought of 90210 and Andrea when I saw the title of this thread?



You know the funny thing is the school in question is the actual school they filmed 90210 at! My town is use to film a lot of TV shows (It did a ton of WB shows, I live down the street from the Buffy house)

This is an actual city run'd school district so I don't have a big bad county to worry about and I really doubt they are going to come and check my house. But I think they may ask for the utility bills and what not. And that's not too much of a hassle. Heck maybe I can get her to pay the bills while she's at it! J/K

PookiePrincess
09-05-2007, 06:03 PM
Some schools around here do random checks to see if the student truly lives in that town.

The district I work in does this. If there is reason to suspect that a child doesn't live where the records say he/she does (you call the home number and mom is never home, the kid is late to school all the time, or the kid even mentions that they are living somewhere else...mind you I work with little kids) they will send district reps to the house to verify address. I have seen them remove kids from school because they don't live in the district.

Maggie8202
09-05-2007, 06:19 PM
In my district when we find out a child has been attending school while not living in the area they are sent a bill for tuition. They are then asked to pay the tuition or go to the district they are supposed to attend. Currently our tuition is a little over $20,000 a year if you do not live in district.

By me this is a huge deal since school taxes are VERY high and it costs about $20,000 a year to educate each student. By letting students attend the school that do not belong takes away programs and support services from those students that do pay the taxes and live in the district. I don't think that is fair. It also leads to taxes raising even more later on.

I am not sure it is such a huge deal in other parts of the country because I know our school taxes are some of the highest etc. and our cost to educate each student is high. Many districts by me have hired registrars to check and double check paper work of addresses and will make home visits if needed.

I am sure that your friend could find out how much it would be to attend your district. I have also heard that some districts will let students from out of district attend if a family member works for the district which may be an idea for your friend.

I understand it is a sad situation and I have heard of so many stories and have had my own students leave because of residency issues. It does break my heart when they have to go to the neighboring district which is not nearly as good. But I have also had parents work extra night jobs to be able to afford their apartments in the better districts just so their kids will get a better education and I praise them for that.

I also think it puts a lot of stress on the child not being able to have people over because their address is a secret etc. which I don't think is fair.

ginad724
09-05-2007, 06:47 PM
In my district when we find out a child has been attending school while not living in the area they are sent a bill for tuition. They are then asked to pay the tuition or go to the district they are supposed to attend. Currently our tuition is a little over $20,000 a year if you do not live in district.

By me this is a huge deal since school taxes are VERY high and it costs about $20,000 a year to educate each student. By letting students attend the school that do not belong takes away programs and support services from those students that do pay the taxes and live in the district. I don't think that is fair. It also leads to taxes raising even more later on.

I am not sure it is such a huge deal in other parts of the country because I know our school taxes are some of the highest etc. and our cost to educate each student is high. Many districts by me have hired registrars to check and double check paper work of addresses and will make home visits if needed.

I agree. I live in a township bordering a major city (with an awful school district) and this is a huge issue for us. They've really started cracking down on it with random checks, re-registration, and making them pay tuition if caught. IMO it's not fair all-around. We have a huge tax burden that we openly went into because of a good school district, why should non tax-payers get that same benefit? It's also not fair to the child who if you did get caught, would be uprooted yet again.

I feel for those parents who live in poor performing districts, but it's still fraud. I wouldn't do it.

LIZNKEITH
09-05-2007, 06:59 PM
:eek: Wow.. What a waste of $$$$

Nope, no joke. Here's the link:
3 Arrests Pending For Illegal Students (http://www.thecitizen.com/node/12032)

I seem to remember they were actually arrested.

It's a sticky subject, but when it boils down to it I can't blame the County for cracking down. As Jenny stated above, citizens of the County pay extremely high property taxes to fund the public school system. As it is, the schools are extremely overcrowded and the school yards are filled with trailers to accomodate the large numbers. All that aside, I think in the eyes of the law their biggest offense was falsifying a sworn affadavit.

FallingforPhil
09-05-2007, 07:56 PM
What Jennylou said.

As a taxpayer, and a teacher, it really steams me that people cheat the system.

We moved last year to a house within my district. We nearly doubled our mortgage to do so, and yet we are still within the boundaries of the "less desirable" high school in the district. Would I love for my (theoretical)kids to go to the "better" high school (where I teach)? Sure. But I know that my kids will get a good education whichever school they attend, because DH and I will be involved parents, and active in our kids' education.

The ONLY way I would consider not sending my kids to their correct school would be for an issue of safety. Even then, I'd find a legal way to solve the problem.

MLA
09-05-2007, 08:00 PM
A dear friend's family did this for me, and I swear I wouldn't have done nearly as well in life if they hadn't. It was one of the kindest things anyone's ever done for me, and I'm grateful to them for doing it.

If you can do it without putting yourself at major risk, I think you should.

MLA
09-05-2007, 08:01 PM
The ONLY way I would consider not sending my kids to their correct school would be for an issue of safety. Even then, I'd find a legal way to solve the problem.


Generally, there's no "legal" way to solve the problem. There aren't any options. In my case, the school I would have been going to would have been physically dangerous, and it was a terribly poor-performing school.

MidwesternGal
09-05-2007, 08:09 PM
Is there an option for open-enrolling?

Our state allows parents and students to petition the school board to apply to another district. If the reasons are good enough, the students will be allowed to move to the district of choice.

It's a big deal because the state gives money to the schools based upon enrollment numbers, so losing that student means money that should have gone to that school will now go to another school.

jennylou
09-05-2007, 08:12 PM
We do have open enrollment, but schools can set a cap on it. Also, it's crappy, imo b/c you only get the amount that the state gives to the school district, no one makes up the difference between what the state gives and what it actually costs to educate a student (which varies by district). No one except the tax payers in that district.

nml12903
09-05-2007, 08:19 PM
I wouldn't do it. Reason being, I had a bad experience with that last year.

A so called friend of mine enrolled her child in my district using my address as the place her child would walk to after school. Biggest problem for me was I didn't know she did it. She didn't bother letting me in on her little plan.

Well, later in the year I got a phone call from the district. Some how somebody found out that she really didn't come here, and since I supposedly signed a form (later found to be forged), I was expected to pay her tuition.

As it ends up, the whole thing was straightened out and her parents were stuck with a rather large bill.

Oh, and I haven't spoken to her mother since.

suzubeane
09-05-2007, 08:20 PM
What's not clear to me about the question is whether or not the kid lives in the same town or a different one? If it's a different town, there may be legal ramifications. Kids here who are caught going to school in the next city by using someone else's address are billed for tuition.

In our city, we have something called "School Choice" which means that kids can go to school's outside of the neighborhood. I used my mother's address to make sure my kids got to go the elementary school in her neighborhood even though the were technically permitted to go there under "School Choice." Other of our neighbors went accross town to this school, but frankly, I had seen enough of the how the School Department bureaucracy worked, and I didn't trust them to give me my choice if I went about it the official way. I figured it would be safer to use my Mom's address, and after each kid had been attending the school for a while, I filled out a "change of address" form. (They were never students at the same time.)

It seems worth mentioning that both kids felt some amount of stress over the charade though. Both were ocassionally slightly fearful about being "found out" and even though they were entitled to be at the school, that was hard to convince them. I don't regret it because I'm glad they got to go to that school, but I did sometimes wonder if I was sending the wrong message about truthfulness. Both kids had their names printed in the school directory with Grammy's address and it was a constant reminder that they'd been registered under this subterfuge.

Delta
09-05-2007, 08:22 PM
I would definitely offer. That is if you know you and the parent and the kid won't get in trouble legally. I trust you wouldn't put yourself or them in legal jeopardy.

Sarah
09-05-2007, 08:50 PM
As a teacher, I'm fine with it. Why shouldn't poorer kids benefit from better districts' schools? It's a totally unfair, corrupt, and unequal system which governs school eligibility, in most places, and I find it totally un-American and just wrong.

Sophia
09-05-2007, 08:53 PM
If the school the kid is supposed to go to hasn't met AYP, but the school you're zoned for has, it may be possible to attend the school based on that. When a campus doesn't meet AYP the students are allowed to go to other schools that aren't having that problem (as per NCLB).

Sarah
09-05-2007, 09:07 PM
There's all these schools in my area (not close by, but the same city) which have these giant signs, saying "Met AYP!" which is just so sad/funny to me- "YAY! We're ADEQUATE!"
Lame.

mar5195
09-05-2007, 11:33 PM
What's not clear to me about the question is whether or not the kid lives in the same town or a different one? If it's a different town, there may be legal ramifications. Kids here who are caught going to school in the next city by using someone else's address are billed for tuition.



The kid does not live in the same city as I do. He lives in a different city (15 miles away). The school district he lives in is LA county school district. The district I live in is strictly for the residents of our city. It's a VERY desirable district and city to live in. You cannot go and get a permit if you parents work in the city & they do not offer permits to anyone just cause. You have to live in the city period. It's been like that for years. Even my parents tried to get me in because my Mother worked in the town, it was a no go. I lived closer to the City's HS then the HS I actually had to attend. But I lived in the City's PO and now in the actual city. It worked out anyway because I was in the magnet program of LAUSD school so the HS was exceptional for gifted students.

I'm guessing because the school district in my city is very desireable they do quite a bit of checking up on new enrollee's. I mean I certainly would like to do something nice for someone. IMO I pay a good chunk of change in taxes to this city not to mention my DH and I run/own business out of this city. I don't feel like I'm cheating the city or the district whatsoever.



You might want to check to see if there is an additional fee that they can pay for their child to go to school there. I know this was done at my HS.
It's not an option, unfortunately. Besides I would imagine the cost would be equivalent to the private school he was previously attending.

Leilynne
09-06-2007, 06:35 AM
Could some one briefly fill in those of us that are not familiar with the American school system? What makes on school district better or worse than another? Why are your taxes different based on your school districts? And how can one be "zoned" for one school and "assigned" to another? I never realised how vastly different American and Canadian schools are, here your taxes are just based on whether your child attends public or seperate (ie catholic) school, and while teaching style and atmosphere certainly differ from school to school (and teacher to teacher for that matter) the curriculum is the curriculum across the board. I switched schools half way through second grade and I easily transitioned because they were studying the same thing at the same time, I can't think of a reason that a parent would be worried about enrolling their child in a school outside their assiged neighborhood school (except for the walk to the babysitter after school reason mentioned earlier). Highschool was slightly different in that each school decided what credits they offered based on popularity and teacher availability, but it wasn't difficult to go to the high school of your choice if one offered courses better suited to you; if they had room you could go. For example my high school was known in the community as "the art school", we had a tv studio, photography studio and darkroom, and a very large selection of fine art and design courses offered. The Catholic high school had a state of the art music program with a recording studio, and the other public high school was geared towards science.

dionysia
09-06-2007, 07:26 AM
What I wish is that for every kid in a desirable school district that gets sent to private school, another kid from a less desirable school district takes his/her slot at the 'better' public school.

Di

Sarah
09-06-2007, 08:46 AM
Could some one briefly fill in those of us that are not familiar with the American school system? What makes on school district better or worse than another? Why are your taxes different based on your school districts? And how can one be "zoned" for one school and "assigned" to another? I never realised how vastly different American and Canadian schools are, here your taxes are just based on whether your child attends public or seperate (ie catholic) school, and while teaching style and atmosphere certainly differ from school to school (and teacher to teacher for that matter) the curriculum is the curriculum across the board. I switched schools half way through second grade and I easily transitioned because they were studying the same thing at the same time, I can't think of a reason that a parent would be worried about enrolling their child in a school outside their assiged neighborhood school (except for the walk to the babysitter after school reason mentioned earlier). Highschool was slightly different in that each school decided what credits they offered based on popularity and teacher availability, but it wasn't difficult to go to the high school of your choice if one offered courses better suited to you; if they had room you could go. For example my high school was known in the community as "the art school", we had a tv studio, photography studio and darkroom, and a very large selection of fine art and design courses offered. The Catholic high school had a state of the art music program with a recording studio, and the other public high school was geared towards science.
It's hard to make generalizations, since it varies by state. Generally speaking, your property taxes go to pay for your district or your zoned school. So schools in my neighborhood get less than half the money per student that schools in the suburb 8 blocks away get. So basically the poorer you are, the less well educated your kids get. Some places have school choice, where you can ask for different schools, but not my city. In my city you go to your local school, but there are "magnet" schools, which are open for admission for anyone, and you have to test in (they tend to be more like G&T schools). Also, under the desegregation laws of the 1960s, if your child is a minority at a school, you can have them enrolled at another school in the city, but there's a waitlist. My white dd could be bussed out of our neighborhood, as every school within a couple miles is 95% or more African American.

It's complicated. I highly recommend the book Savage Inequalities, by Jonathan Kozol, for an eye opening read on this topic.

Chelsea524
09-06-2007, 08:55 AM
Could some one briefly fill in those of us that are not familiar with the American school system? What makes on school district better or worse than another? Why are your taxes different based on your school districts? And how can one be "zoned" for one school and "assigned" to another? I never realised how vastly different American and Canadian schools are, here your taxes are just based on whether your child attends public or seperate (ie catholic) school, and while teaching style and atmosphere certainly differ from school to school (and teacher to teacher for that matter) the curriculum is the curriculum across the board. I switched schools half way through second grade and I easily transitioned because they were studying the same thing at the same time, I can't think of a reason that a parent would be worried about enrolling their child in a school outside their assiged neighborhood school (except for the walk to the babysitter after school reason mentioned earlier). Highschool was slightly different in that each school decided what credits they offered based on popularity and teacher availability, but it wasn't difficult to go to the high school of your choice if one offered courses better suited to you; if they had room you could go. For example my high school was known in the community as "the art school", we had a tv studio, photography studio and darkroom, and a very large selection of fine art and design courses offered. The Catholic high school had a state of the art music program with a recording studio, and the other public high school was geared towards science.
At the moment our school districts are all pretty similar. I couldn't tell you what school is better than what unless I look up online to see the avarage grades but they are all pretty similar. This is all about to change though, up until now our districts covered poor and rich areas in the same district meaning they all got equal share of the money. Starting next school year (if it gets passed which I know it will) they are going to split the district where it is going to be the East side(rich side) and the West side(poor side) they are each going to get the same amount of money but people from the west side will no longer be bussed up to the east side schools, the west side schools will have 3 times the amount of students and still get the same amount of funding as the east side where they have 3 times less students, its not going to be based on the number of students it is just going to be a flat rate. The west side schools will suffer because of this. I am even on the east side and still hate that they are doing this even though it means my kids will benifit.

LittleFredPunkinHead
09-06-2007, 08:58 AM
It's not just poorer districts that have poorer schools though. It's also districts where voters don't pass levies. You can have two middle-class school districts and one will have great schools and the other crappy schools, because one chooses to fund their schools well and the other doesn't.

MrsBeckyLP
09-06-2007, 09:10 AM
Just an FYI, but in some (and all in Wisconsin) districts that allow open enrollment, there are deadlines for applying, usually in February or March of the previous school year.

As for the OP's question, I would go ahead and do it if you think you can get away with it.

lauren f s
09-06-2007, 09:36 AM
We're doing this for my SIL. She's a "rebellious" almost 17 year old and got into trouble with teachers and such at her schools, which were already very, very crappy. She had dropped out and was going to get her GED but decided she wanted to go to school, finish, and graduate.

We specifically chose a house in our town because of the schools. When SIL was talking about going back to school MIL approached us and asked if she could send SIL to the school in our town instead of theirs. MIL passes our house (generally) every day going to work and it would be just as easy to drop SIL here as in their town.

DH had to enroll her and sign on as her guardian (not legally, just for paperwork with the school). Basically if she misses too much, gets into trouble, etc he's the one that gets called. They had to attend several meetings and it took several days for everything to get lined up, but so far things are going well for us.

(It's nice for us, too, because when she gets out of school she walks to our kids' daycare, picks them up, and they hang out at home with her for a couple of hours.)

SiValleySteph
09-06-2007, 10:14 AM
I wouldn't do it because it's dishonest. I'm pretty black & white when it comes to lying. I'm a horrible liar and wouldn't be able to do it.

They were cracking down on this recently in a neighboring high school district. They checked on everyone's address, I think. I just looked up the article (http://www.kron.com/Global/story.asp?S=3166283) and they kicked out 300(!!) students that didn't actually live in the district. According to the school district:

it now has a budget crisis and can no longer handle the extra students

That's 300 kids just in high school. That's a lot. It's a 5 high school district.

ETA - I would do it only if there was a way to do it honestly, such as lauren described.

LIZNKEITH
09-06-2007, 10:34 AM
DH had to enroll her and sign on as her guardian (not legally, just for paperwork with the school). Basically if she misses too much, gets into trouble, etc he's the one that gets called. They had to attend several meetings and it took several days for everything to get lined up, but so far things are going well for us.

My parents did something like this for my BFF in junior high/high school. However, the laws were a bit stricter in the sense that they had to file for joint custody of her. From 7th-10th grade she lived with us about 50% of the time. Otherwise, she stayed with her sister and she would drop her off at school.

jajacobsen
09-06-2007, 10:40 AM
It's not just poorer districts that have poorer schools though. It's also districts where voters don't pass levies. You can have two middle-class school districts and one will have great schools and the other crappy schools, because one chooses to fund their schools well and the other doesn't.


Yep - an din some affluent areas, there are really crappy public schools because no one ever votes for levies/bonds, special assessments, etc taht benefit teh public schools because the majority of parents send their kids to private schools. It becomes a terrible situation thet becomes a viscious circle. That was my experience when I lived in Macon. Thank goodness taht was not an issue for me (no children).

I live in the metro Atlanta area and it is a big deal here with severe penalties.

Leilynne
09-06-2007, 12:51 PM
It's hard to make generalizations, since it varies by state. Generally speaking, your property taxes go to pay for your district or your zoned school. So schools in my neighborhood get less than half the money per student that schools in the suburb 8 blocks away get. So basically the poorer you are, the less well educated your kids get.


Starting next school year (if it gets passed which I know it will) they are going to split the district where it is going to be the East side(rich side) and the West side(poor side) they are each going to get the same amount of money but people from the west side will no longer be bussed up to the east side schools, the west side schools will have 3 times the amount of students and still get the same amount of funding as the east side where they have 3 times less students, its not going to be based on the number of students it is just going to be a flat rate.


Yep - an din some affluent areas, there are really crappy public schools because no one ever votes for levies/bonds, special assessments, etc taht benefit teh public schools because the majority of parents send their kids to private schools. .

Sorry to throw the thread off topic, but this is horrifying to me. I don't have children but I can't imagine my nieces and nephews in such an unfair situation. Right now every public school in our county is being upgraded to new standards, the school in the "bad" part of town is getting just as much work done as the school in the more affluent neighborhoods.

LyLMyssChaos
09-06-2007, 06:14 PM
Something else to consider is that if by chance the kid gets into any legal trouble, they often go by school records as to whom is the parent/legal guardian.

I've seen my MIL get into trouble with this involving my niece. My niece did live with her when she was registered for school, but then she moved and my MIL was held responsible for my niece's actions.

DansGirl
09-07-2007, 01:29 PM
I wouldn't do it because it breaks the rules and, IMO, teaches a poor lesson to the child.

I second that the parent should look into open enrollment. They've likely missed the deadline for this year, but could try for next year.

j*east
09-07-2007, 06:01 PM
I wouldn't do it because besides all the other reasons, 15 miles is a long commute, especially in southern CA. Along with everything else, it seems like a greater cost to the kid than it's worth.

What I would do (or would have done, last winter/spring) if my kid was academically talented and did well in private school, is apply to other private schools for financial aid. A lot of schools are looking for bright kids of lesser means and have money and programs to help them succeed. Given that this boy already attended private school, he'd have an even better cahnce of getting into another one.

Or, now that I think about it, I'd talk to the newly-too-expensive private school and see if they can offer assistance in any way.

I'm all for helping kids get well-educated, but making them live a lie and travel long distances, etc., isn't the way to do it.

kam
09-07-2007, 08:24 PM
A lot of public schools also allow a limited amount of students from outside their district in if 1) the student pays a tuition fee (might be less than privatet school tuition) 2) the student shows tremendous capability in a sport, academic field or art (given a "scholarship"). Why not encourage the parent to try that route? I would strongly discourage you from breaking the rules not only for your own sake (as the punishment varies depending on the area) but for the sake of the student (what happens if he is caught?) and the parent (again, I'd suspect that would be some kind of evasion).

And if the district is good, chances are you will get caught. I saw this first-hand (as my mom was responsible for that lovely part of the school system, among many other things) and trust me - she caught a ton of people doing it. I don't know what the ramifications were at the time (this was years ago), but she didn't have to work too hard to prove her suspicions almost every time. The person responsible for this will probably look in surrounding towns for listings of the parents, call the listing and even visit the address listed. He or she will ask for multiple utility bills being sent to the addess in the parent's name, voter registration, etc. If you claim the kid is just living with you, you'll probably have to go even more hoops (and depending on the state, might have to deal with DCF).

Since our town was pretty much a place you'd expect Big Bird to walk down where everyone knew everyone, it wasn't that complex for my mom. In one case, a kid claimed to live in the town and he was caught immediately. Maybe they should've researched where my mom lived because they claimed to live two doors down from her. ;)

I understand your intentions are good but to me this is like helping someone evade their taxes because they need the money, you know?

jay&erinn
09-07-2007, 08:34 PM
I also wouldn't do it. I'm pretty black and white when it comes to honesty too. We live in a crapy school district that wasn't so bad when we moved here but has gone down hill quickly. All of the tax base (property) for the district is being bought up by the local tax exempt hospital and college. Older DD just started private school. It kills me to pay taxes and then pay for private school (I'll work just to send them through grade school), but it's what we need to do.

Around here, if you get caught, you also have to pay back tution which amounts to much more than a private education. From what I understand it's pretty easy to be caught too. All it takes is a friend who has been at the kids real house to let it slip, or have a fight with a friend who knows and they go and blab and it's all over school.

Weddings by
09-08-2007, 12:05 AM
here your taxes are just based on whether your child attends public or separate (ie catholic) school

That's interesting; I had no idea that Canada charged different taxes if a person's child were to attend a private school.

Are you saying that only parents pay school taxes?


To the OP:
I wouldn't do it.

BeachBum
09-08-2007, 05:37 AM
Could some one briefly fill in those of us that are not familiar with the American school system?
Yes what has been said above is true. But just to be clear--inequitable funding is the ramification not the intent. The intent is to keep school districts local. Meaning that local governments (school boards), local people and parents have more control over their schools--they aren't getting told what to do and how to do it from some beauracrat 500 miles away. Districts get to choose how to spend their money. One could build a great football stadium and another could choose to build a science lab.
Additionally, all property owners pay taxes that contribute to schools--even if you don't have kids. Also, if you send your kids to private school you still pay local school taxes. There have been talks of a tax credit for parents paying for private school but there not any in my state.

Leilynne
09-08-2007, 09:31 AM
That's interesting; I had no idea that Canada charged different taxes if a person's child were to attend a private school.

Are you saying that only parents pay school taxes?


To the OP:
I wouldn't do it.

No, everyone who owns property pays school tax. There are not alot of private schools here (at least in my part of Ontario, can't speak for all of Canada), what we have are "seperate schools" which are still public in that anyone can attend them but they have a seperate school board from "normal" public schools. So for example my county has 3 school boards 1-My County Public School Board 2- My County Catholic School Board 3- My County Protestant School Board. Each board has it's own curriculum but they are all accountable to teach at least the Ontario Standard Curriculum, what they include after that is up to them. You don't have to be catholic to attend catholic school, but you do have to arrange for your school tax to go to the Catholic Scool Board. I suppose non-parents that wished to support one of the seperate school boards could re-direct their school tax as well but I'm not sure on that. So your taxes go to pay for schools for the whole county and the money is used where needed. I suppose there could be certain counties that are underfunded at the local level, but schools are Provencialy supported as well. I guess that's what is most interesting to me, is there no State support for public schools? It's great that the boards are local, we have local boards as well but the province still coughs up the cash (not enough mind you, but that's another story).

LittleFredPunkinHead
09-08-2007, 12:20 PM
No, everyone who owns property pays school tax. There are not alot of private schools here (at least in my part of Ontario, can't speak for all of Canada), what we have are "seperate schools" which are still public in that anyone can attend them but they have a seperate school board from "normal" public schools. So for example my county has 3 school boards 1-My County Public School Board 2- My County Catholic School Board 3- My County Protestant School Board. Each board has it's own curriculum but they are all accountable to teach at least the Ontario Standard Curriculum, what they include after that is up to them. You don't have to be catholic to attend catholic school, but you do have to arrange for your school tax to go to the Catholic Scool Board. I suppose non-parents that wished to support one of the seperate school boards could re-direct their school tax as well but I'm not sure on that. So your taxes go to pay for schools for the whole county and the money is used where needed. I suppose there could be certain counties that are underfunded at the local level, but schools are Provencialy supported as well. I guess that's what is most interesting to me, is there no State support for public schools? It's great that the boards are local, we have local boards as well but the province still coughs up the cash (not enough mind you, but that's another story).
The states provide funding too.

I just can't see that system working here. You'd have to have a board and monetary support for every religion that decided to open a school. That'd get so hairy.

Leilynne
09-08-2007, 01:38 PM
The states provide funding too.

I just can't see that system working here. You'd have to have a board and monetary support for every religion that decided to open a school. That'd get so hairy.

In Ontario only catholic or protestant schools can form a public school board other religeons have private schools. There is some debate about this right now as in other provinces it's all or none when it comes to public funding for religeous schools. The reason for the allowance for catholics in Ontario is because of historical influence, originally the catholic church basicly ran all schools so they are kind of grandfathered in (same with catholic hospitals), I think there is only 1 seperate protestant board left, I don't know what their story is. Apparently in the provinces that have public funding for any seperate board (religeous, vocational) it works just fine, the provencial money (which is by far the bigger percentage) is all the same budget it's the local money that's split up (as far as I know). You have to remember that we pay way more taxes than Americans do on just about everything so even though we have local control over public programs like schools and hospitals the bulk of the cash comes from the provencial and federal governments.

ETA: I feel really bad for derailing the thread without addressing the OP's question. It's hard for me to have an opinion without 100% understanding the system, but I don't think I would do it. If he's a good student hopefully he can make the most of whatever programs his new school does offer. Learning to work within the system honestly is a valuable lesson in and of itself.

elle jee
09-08-2007, 05:47 PM
I don't see why letting someone use my address so their son can to to the local HS is a problem.


I would probably do it, but... um, I do think it is "wrong".

artist
09-08-2007, 08:53 PM
Hmm. On the one hand, I can sort of see why you'd want to do it, and in the grand scheme of things, if that's the worst crime you commit in life, that's not so bad.

On the other hand, it does seem pretty dishonest and unfair to others.

Then again, where I live there is school choice and I also think the schools in my city are fine. The funny thing is, almost none of my friends send their kids to the "neighborhood schools", because the "neighborhood schools" are often two miles away and because they are "neighborhood", there is no bus provided. Therefore, to avoid having the kids having to walk two miles each way up hill in the snow :) to school, most people (that I know) send their kids to OTHER public schools. I've seen the list of schools that my theoretical child could attend based on my address, and I think there are plenty of decent choices.

I suppose though if I felt like my entire city were lacking in the public school issue, maybe I'd feel differently.

Some of you have brought up the issue of parents having to pay tuition for a child to attend out of the district. I have to ask, why would there be "tuition" at a public school? That doesn't make sense. If it's a public school, it's free.

artist
09-08-2007, 08:59 PM
This is sort of OT, and doesn't specifically apply to your friend's situation, but I wanted to comment on the public school issue real quick.

I get pretty annoyed sometimes when people assume that just because a public school happens to be in a poorer neighborhood, somehow it's a "bad school". While I was in the VISTA program and working with youth program development in a specific (poor) neighborhood, I became very well aquainted with three public elementary schools in this (poor) neighborhood. I was actually very impressed with the quality of education these children were receiving as well as the dedication and commitment on behalf of the teachers and staff.

One of these schools started the kindergarteners on learning how to read! When I was that age, my parents paid tuition to send me to a Catholic school, thinking the small class sizes would be better and that I'd have a better chance of learning how to read. How interesting that I didn't learn until first grade!

rubyslippers
09-09-2007, 05:28 AM
In my district public schools are free to residents of the district, if someone wanted to attend from another area they would be expected apply for a waver and to pay tuition because my district does not have access to their property taxes as those taxes are spent in their home district and are not transferable. There are a few students who do this. A friend of mine moved after sophomore year and then paid for junior and senior year so she could stay in our high school.

suzubeane
09-09-2007, 07:47 AM
I get pretty annoyed sometimes when people assume that just because a public school happens to be in a poorer neighborhood, somehow it's a "bad school".In my city, the assumption would be correct - at least at the elementary and middle level. The selective high school is right across the ally from one of the worst performing ones, but in terms of neighborhood elementary schools, the worst performing schools are in the worst neighborhoods.

This is likely due to a combination of factors, but from what I've seen, most of them could be traced back to parents involvement in school in the lower grades. Even with "School Choice" the majority of kids attend in their home neighborhoods. In poorer areas, you're more likely to find kids whose parents work more than one job, work second or third shift jobs, are struggling to learn English, aren't living here legally, or frankly, are just preoccupied with other things (like the stress of being poor!)

The elementary school my kids went to is attended by kids from all over the city, but is fed into by the most affluent neighborhood. THOSE kids have a higher number of educated SAHMs who comprise a core group that drives the PTO, and they work hard to get other parents involved. But the division still runs really deep.

eli1126
09-09-2007, 09:45 AM
I wouldn't do it. I know that a large suburban district, and a top rated school, locally has resorted to using investigators to ensure that the students are actually living at the address they listed in their registration.

Standrea
09-10-2007, 06:34 AM
Time-outs have also become a joke, since collin will do what he knows is wrong and then place himself in time-out.

Oh, Beth! I'd love to know what school this is. My sister is a principal at a school, and they, too, have resorted to having investigators. Last year, they found a student actually lived 40 miles away! And, it's a good school district, but definately not the best.

I wouldn't do it either, because I think that there is too much to risk.

Sarah
09-10-2007, 11:09 AM
Yes what has been said above is true. But just to be clear--inequitable funding is the ramification not th. Yes what has been said above is true. But just to be clear--inequitable funding is the ramification not the intent.
Says you. I disagree, but that's a topic for another thread.


I get pretty annoyed sometimes when people assume that just because a public school happens to be in a poorer neighborhood, somehow it's a "bad school".Well, you VISTA esperience notwithstanding, it's statistically true that income of students in a given school is linked to school performance. Not every school, but still true.

One of these schools started the kindergarteners on learning how to read! When I was that age, my parents paid tuition to send me to a Catholic school, thinking the small class sizes would be better and that I'd have a better chance of learning how to read. How interesting that I didn't learn until first grade!It's pretty standard to teach reading in kindergarten or even HeadStart preschool. Your experience probably happened 20+ years ago, when kindergarten was play-based, usually half day, very relaxed. In urban settings children are expected (by standardized tests) to have learned to read by K and what used to be considered a 1 grade skill is now being seen as 1st grade. I don't think it's impressive or a sign of good teaching that that school was teaching reading- it's a sign of the effects of programs which are "standards-based" or "accountability" based (like the horrendous NCLB legislation).

TOMama
09-10-2007, 11:58 AM
You know the funny thing is the school in question is the actual school they filmed 90210 at! My town is use to film a lot of TV shows (It did a ton of WB shows, I live down the street from the Buffy house)

This is an actual city run'd school district so I don't have a big bad county to worry about and I really doubt they are going to come and check my house. But I think they may ask for the utility bills and what not. And that's not too much of a hassle. Heck maybe I can get her to pay the bills while she's at it! J/K

Mar5195 - I don't live there anymore, but I grew up in your city and went to a high school in the same district. I have a friend doing the same thing. They do offer out of district permits, but in her case, the waiting list was extremely long & she knew she wouldn't make the cut. She even WORKS for the district and her childcare is there as well... She switched the electric & gas bill. She's still concerned about home checks where they can request proof of address on Car Registration, Insurance, Bank Statements, D/L, etc. Not sure if she's changed any of these yet. Wouldn't be a big deal since this is her parent's address, but not sure if you'd want it to go that far. Just an FYI!

lauren f s
09-10-2007, 12:02 PM
One of these schools started the kindergarteners on learning how to read! When I was that age, my parents paid tuition to send me to a Catholic school, thinking the small class sizes would be better and that I'd have a better chance of learning how to read. How interesting that I didn't learn until first grade!
My sister is going to school for elementary education and she said that they (kindergarteners) had to be able to read by the end of the first semester at most schools around here.

lowcountrywed
09-10-2007, 02:06 PM
I wouldn't do it because it's dishonest. I'm pretty black & white when it comes to lying.


I agree. What kind of lesson are you teaching your kids? That it's okay to break a law if you don't think the system is fair? That telling a lie doesn't matter as long as it's for the greater good?