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View Full Version : Replacing Carpet in a furnished room - is it possible?



fats
09-26-2006, 12:39 PM
Is it possible to replace carpeting without removing all the furniture from the room?

The carpet in our bedroom is disgusting thanks to our dogs. It's beige berber that has been puked on (among other things) too many times to count and while I try to have it professionally cleaned often, some of those stains won't come out. The problem is the furniture in our bedroom is massive and heavy and almost impossible to get out of the room. I know - we got it in, but trust me when I say it wasn't easy. I really have no idea how the delivery guys did it. The entrance into our bedroom includes a small hallway with a sharp turn and it's very hard to maneuver with big pieces.

I had basically given up on ever being able to replace the carpeting but I figured I'd give it a shot and reach out to all of you to see if you have any ideas. I'm wondering if it's possible to move whatever pieces we can out of the room and then just push what's left to one side, do half the floor and then move it to the other side to finish off. I don't even care what we put down at this point - new wall to wall, those squares of carpet you can put together or better yet, hardwood - which would be a lot easier with the dogs.

Any ideas?

southerner
09-26-2006, 12:51 PM
Not unless you want to have different sections of capret glued together, you need to remove all the furniture.

jennylou
09-26-2006, 12:55 PM
Everything needs to be moved out.

Jennifer
09-26-2006, 01:30 PM
We did hardwoods in our family room moving out "most" of the furniture - but had a couple large pieces we moved to one side of the room - laid 60% of the hardwood and then moved it to the otherside and finished. I think that would only work with wood or carpet squares where you could do the install in "pieces"...rolled carpet I think you would need to stretch so having furniture on it would keep you from getting a tight fit.

It is easier if you can move everything out.

greenbunny
09-26-2006, 01:52 PM
We have puke-happy cats and we plan to replace our carpeting with hardwood. The kind with individual planks, not snap-together sections. So we could probably move everything to one side, then vice versa.

You won't be able to leave the furniture in there to lay carpet, but unless your dogs were chronically ill and are now cured, I'd expect your problem will continue on a new carpet. I'd definitely consider hard flooring of some type, and area rugs that can be lifted and cleaned.

maplekitty
09-26-2006, 06:28 PM
I'd suggest putting down laminate if you have messy dogs. Now normally I'm all about the real hardwood, but pee or puke can really damage hardwood (if you dont catch it, and clean it up asap), and you dont want to spend the money and then have it ruined and stained.

With that said...you really need to take all the furniture out. Tearing up and rolling up old carpet takes up a lot of room, and is messy. You'll have to remove the underlay (hopefully it's not glued down, because then it will have to be scraped up), and there are tack strips all along the walls that would have to come up (or can be reused if you decide to put down new carpet).
Installing new flooring is labourous, and needs rooms to move around. Are you planning on doing it yourself or having someone come in and do it? If you're having someone come in to do it, they *may* charge more if the furniture is all in there and they have to work around it, or they just may not be able to work around it at all.

Sophia
09-27-2006, 09:18 AM
Is it possible to replace your flooring without removing all the firniture? Yeah, I can think of a few flooring products that would work in that situation, fewer that would also hold up to the dog issues, and fewer still that would also look good.

I don't think I'd even consider not removing the furniture, and I would stay clear of carpet, hardwood, laminate, and anything else that won't hold up to wetness and constant cleaning. I'm probably go with ceramic or a high end vinyl.

ceaserbride
09-27-2006, 09:21 AM
My opinion is it really depends how big your room is. If you have a bigger room I think you could remove everything that is removable and then put everything else on one side of the room. Remember the headboard and footboard can come off the bed and drawers can be removed from dressers.

I'm with Maplekitty and would go with laminate. After everything is moved to one side of the room tear out 1/2 the carpet using a carpet knife (as already said, hopefully your underlay isn't glued down) then lay the laminate on one side of the room. Move all the furniture to the finished side and do the other half.

That said, if you have a small room there probably won't be enough space to do this and work around the furniture that has to stay in the room.

Good Luck!

ignutzz
09-27-2006, 09:25 AM
You're perfectly safe putting in a hardwood floor. (hello, our parquet floors are nearly 100 years old and hold up just fine to cleaning and cat puke.) If you'd like a little extra protection from moisture, don't use a pre-finished hardwood (leave an open seam because the finish is beveled). Any surface will show wear and tear after years of use, both pre-finished and regular hardwood can be refinished to its original lustre.

good luck!

mindy75
09-27-2006, 11:12 AM
Not and replace it with carpet. Carpet has to be stretched. You can't do that if you have furniture in the way even if it is against the wall. I agree with PPs who advise against carpet anyway. Not with your doggies. I'd go with hardwoods if you can afford it and are prepared to be extremely vigilant about urine especially. Laminate and vinyl peel and stick tiles you could do with furniture in the room. Ceramic tiles? Doesn't the plywood subfloor have to come out and be replaced with cement backerboard? We didn't do that at our last house, but we wished we had. Stepping into the kitchen was a step up and dd kept tripping over the transition piece between the laminate in the living room and the ceramic in the kitchen.

Sophia
09-27-2006, 11:42 AM
Ceramic tiles? Doesn't the plywood subfloor have to come out and be replaced with cement backerboard?

All the houses around here have poured concrete slabs. I didn't even think of that. I was advising moving all the furniture anyway, though.

In any case, most flooring options will take much longer to install if the furniture is left in the room (assuming it's possible to do it that way at all) because some require the floor to set a certain amount of time before putting furniture back in. That would mean a portion of the floor would be done, lag time, move furniture, do other side of room.

mamax2
09-27-2006, 11:52 AM
It is possible. We had it done years ago when we lived in a small cape cod style house and the entire upstairs was 2 BR/1 BA. We packed away and moved as much as we could and we paid extra to have the guys move the heavy furniture out of the way. We did replace carpet w/carpet and it was for exactly the same reasons (dog accidents) that the PP mentioned. The caveat here is that we were putting the house on the market and were doing this for showing purposes. We knew we didn't have to live with it, kwim? So if it wasn't stretched properly or didn't hold up great, we would never know :o It did hold up just fine for the next 6 weeks though :p

I would try to do some type of wood or laminate product if you have on-going dog issues though. I'd also keep them out of your room unless you're in there with them too. I'd also go with a light finish because dog nails do a number on a darker finish.


If you'd like a little extra protection from moisture, don't use a pre-finished hardwood (leave an open seam because the finish is beveled).
Not all pre-finished hardwood has a beveled edge. We have pre-finished engineered hardwood floors right now and there is no bevel (although it was an option). It looks smooth as glass.

As for the ceramic tile, unless you live in Southern California, Arizona, Texas or Florida, I'd pass. Those are (off the top of my head) pretty much the only places where people are really accepting of tile in bedrooms. I would say the majority of the country wants to see wood or carpet in bedrooms.

mindy75
09-27-2006, 12:09 PM
All the houses around here have poured concrete slabs. I didn't even think of that. I was advising moving all the furniture anyway, though.


Poured concrete? That would have been soo much easier to do the tile. I was just saying that I was told when we installed ours that the subfloor should come up, but we skipped that step and put the backerboard over the old sub. We learned why your supposed to replace it :o . The awkward transitions and the weight of the floor. OOPs. Plywood on 4x4 joists is standard flooring around here. Anything else never occured to me either.

ETA: I agree with mamax2about ceramic in the bedrooms. I'm pretty much turned off by it in any room other than a kitchen/bath/laundry. It seems a little "cold" for a bedroom or even a family/living room. I didn't catch the bedroom part of the OP's post. I'd go with hardwoods or a laminate wood in a bedroom. No ceramic or vinyl.

ignutzz
09-27-2006, 12:21 PM
Not all pre-finished hardwood has a beveled edge. We have pre-finished engineered hardwood floors right now and there is no bevel (although it was an option). It looks smooth as glass.

Beveled or not, it's still a slightly more permeable surface than a floor that's been poly'd/sealed after install. That was my only point. (ETA: this is specific to new/relatively new REAL wood floors. Engineered flooring is meant to combat the issues of natural materials so moisture wouldn't be much of an problem.)

mamax2
09-27-2006, 02:12 PM
Beveled or not, it's still a slightly more permeable surface than a floor that's been poly'd/sealed after install. That was my only point. (ETA: this is specific to new/relatively new REAL wood floors. Engineered flooring is meant to combat the issues of natural materials so moisture wouldn't be much of an problem.)
ITA! That's why we have engineered floors - we live in a coastal/high humidity area. It is true though that beveled edges catch a lot more dust/dirt than smooth finish - whether that be sealed floors or pre-finished. And, for the record, I can speak for dog poo or pee (thank goodness!), but the puke cleans up great off our hardwoods!

fats
09-28-2006, 09:57 AM
Thanks for all the great advice. My older dog actually ruined the hardwood floors in my apartment years ago, but that's because I got her as a puppy before she was housetrained and she'd pee on newspaper that would sit there for hours while I was at work (she couldn't be kept in a crate). Anyway, now she's housebroken but has accidents now and then - the main problem is her weak stomach - so I think we'd be ok with hardwood.

Sounds like we really need to move all the furniture out though and I just don't know how that's going to happen. It's pretty depressing. The carpet cleaner is coming again next week so hopefully he'll be able to get most of the stains out again.